Weekly Hotlinks – The Frozen Ponytail

Posted by
Mike Lyon
Date
 December 22, 2008
Comments
6 comments

Photo by joshbousel

Photo by joshbousel

It was 9 degrees here this morning – but that didn’t stop my wife from getting up early to go running in the dark. I figured if she was disciplined enough to get up, brave the cold and come back with a frozen ponytail – then I could do my weekly hotlinks post.

There were some great articles last week:

  • Seth Godin had a post on Brands, social, clutter and the sundae exploring social media and some of the mistakes a business should look to avoid
  • Keithe Good had a post over on BHI’s blog on asking Are We Primed for a Recovery? I truly feel this is not the same rhetoric we saw back when everybody wished this problem would go away. We still have some major issues to work through – but I believe most builders have accepted the current market and are making extremely positive changes.
  • There was a lot of buzz on this article – Twitter has made Dell $1 million in revenue I saw some great commentary. Basically – Twitter did not make Dell $1 mil – but the offers distributed by Twitter made Dell $1 mil. It has the same affect as offers by email, Adwords, telemarketing, and traditional advertising. However, the point is that Twitter can be a viable source of broadcasting the message.
  • Here is a post on Successful Blogging Must Haves Similar to the Twitter conversation. Builders must realize that creating a blog is not a magic bullet. It must have a voice and an audience so people to take notice.

I hope everyone has great plans for the holiday! I will have a couple of re-posts of popular articles from this year and will be back on the “writing horse” after the 1st. I am also trying to wrap up 2 sales this week – motivated shoppers looking for a big Christmas present to themselves! We had a customer lock in at 4.7% – it’s a great time to buy!

  • O Dear Great Geek Friend,
    What is a gravatar? Like an avatar, but…with gravitas?
    Where duth one findeth such? Since I am behind times, I thought ancient language would help raise your sympathy for me.
    Erik

  • O Dear Great Geek Friend,
    What is a gravatar? Like an avatar, but…with gravitas?
    Where duth one findeth such? Since I am behind times, I thought ancient language would help raise your sympathy for me.
    Erik

  • No problem Erik . From their site: A gravatar, or globally recognized avatar, is quite simply an avatar image that follows you from blog to blog appearing beside your name when you comment on gravatar enabled sites. Avatars help identify your posts on web forums, so why not on blogs?

    You can get one here: http://en.gravatar.com/

  • No problem Erik . From their site: A gravatar, or globally recognized avatar, is quite simply an avatar image that follows you from blog to blog appearing beside your name when you comment on gravatar enabled sites. Avatars help identify your posts on web forums, so why not on blogs?

    You can get one here: http://en.gravatar.com/

  • Hi Mike,
    Thank you again for the hotlinks. They are hot indeed.

    Seth Godin is a prophet (profit)! His insight into the psychology of consumer preference as it relates to traditional advertising is second to none.

    Companies using social media, especially Twitter, must be careful not to use traditional interruption tactics through the new media. If we don’t give consumers information that benefits them, we will soon be loosing followers and friends. Like Seth says below, if what you’re Twittering wouldn’t work at a cocktail party, it won’t work on Twitter either.

    I love Seth’s mantra. “Traditional advertising is inherently selfish. It interrupts in order to generate money (part of which pays for more interruptions). That approach doesn’t work at a cocktail party, or at a funeral or in a social network.”

    Jim Adams – CEO
    New Homes Directory.com

  • Hi Mike,
    Thank you again for the hotlinks. They are hot indeed.

    Seth Godin is a prophet (profit)! His insight into the psychology of consumer preference as it relates to traditional advertising is second to none.

    Companies using social media, especially Twitter, must be careful not to use traditional interruption tactics through the new media. If we don’t give consumers information that benefits them, we will soon be loosing followers and friends. Like Seth says below, if what you’re Twittering wouldn’t work at a cocktail party, it won’t work on Twitter either.

    I love Seth’s mantra. “Traditional advertising is inherently selfish. It interrupts in order to generate money (part of which pays for more interruptions). That approach doesn’t work at a cocktail party, or at a funeral or in a social network.”

    Jim Adams – CEO
    New Homes Directory.com